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Tag: clerks of court
  • Tick Tock: Mandatory Time Requirements to Enter A/N/D and TPR Orders

    Subchapter I of G.S. Chapter 7B (the Juvenile Code) governs child abuse, neglect, dependency, and termination of parental rights cases in North Carolina. The Juvenile Code “sets out a sequential process for abuse, neglect, or dependency cases, wherein each required action or event must occur within a prescribed amount of time after the preceding stage in the case.” In re T.R.P., 360 N.C. 588, 593 (2006). Included in the statutory time frames are the timing for entry of orders. What exactly does the Juvenile Code require? And, why does it matter? Continue Reading

  • The Clerk’s Contempt Authority

    The clerk of superior court and assistant clerks, when acting as judicial officials, have the authority to punish criminal contempt and hold persons in civil contempt.  G.S. 7A-103(7).  However, this authority does not exactly mirror the authority of district or superior court judges who have broad contempt powers.  In fact, the clerk’s authority is limited to two instances:

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  • Dude, Where’s My Note?

    UPDATE: On February, 7, 2017, in an unpublished decision, In re Foreclosure of Iannucci, the NC Court of Appeals upheld the trial court’s reliance on a lost note affidavit as competent evidence to support the court’s findings of fact and, in turn, the conclusion of law that the lender is the holder of a valid debt.   In the opinion, the court did not directly address the jurisdictional issues raised in question two below.  However, the superior court makes the same inquiry on appeal de novo from the clerk as the clerk does in the first instance in a power of sale foreclosure.  See In re Foreclosure of Lucks, ___ NC ___ (Dec. 21, 2016).   By finding that the superior court appropriately relied on a lost note affidavit, a similar finding would likely apply to the jurisdictional authority of the clerk to rely on a lost note affidavit.  Because the court’s decision is unpublished, it does not constitute controlling legal authority, but is some indication of how a court may decide a similar issue on appeal in the future.

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